Making Of Silk Purses From Sows

New chemical industries created in the late 19th century both invented new materials (e.g. Bakelite (1907) and promised to transform valueless into valuable materials. Proverbially, you could not make a silk purse of a sow’s ear—until the US firm Arhur D. Little published in 1921 “On the Making of Silk Purses from Sows’ Ears”, its research proving that when “chemistry puts on overalls and gets down to business . . .new values appear. New and better paths are opened to reach the goals desired.”

 

Recycling was a highlight throughout World War II. During the war, financial constraints and significant material shortages due to war efforts made it necessary for countries to reuse goods and recycle materials. These resource shortages caused by the world wars, and other such world-changing occurrences, greatly encouraged recycling. The struggles of war claimed much of the material resources available, leaving little for the civilian population. It became necessary for most homes to recycle their waste, as recycling offered an extra source of materials allowing people to make the most of what was available to them. Recycling household materials meant more resources for war efforts and a better chance of victory.[10]Massive government promotion campaigns were carried out in the home front during World War II in every country involved in the war, urging citizens to donate metals and conserve fiber, as a matter of patriotism.

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  1. greatly encouraged recycling. The struggles of war claimed much of the material resources available, leaving little for the civilian population. It became necessary for most homes to recycle their waste

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